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osborne unveiled the government's proposed tax and spending plans to members of the british house of commons. he told members 600,000 more jobs will be added this year according to forecasters. corporation tax will be cut to 20%, the lowest tax rate than any other economy in the world. in his one-hour speech, chancellor osborne announced measures aimed at assisting small business owners, first- time homebuyers, and british veterans. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. mr. deputy speaker, this is a budget for people who aspire to work hard and get on. it's a budget for people who realise there are no easy answers to problems built up over many years. just the painstaking work of putting right what went so badly wrong. and together with the british people we are, slowly but surely, fixing our country's economic problems. we've now cut the deficit not by a quarter, but by a third. we've helped business create not a million new jobs, but one and a quarter million new jobs. we've kept interest rates at record lows. but mr. deputy speaker, despite the progress we've made, th
taxes and pay cuts, instead what they did was they taxed bank deposits. they're calling it a tax. a lot of folks are calling it a seizure. here's what's significant. even small depositors below the insurance threshold are going to get hit. the original number for small depositors below 100,000 euros was 6.5%. they're working in parliament right now about shifting that and any other subsequent plan suggests that if you have insured money it will still get hit. what did we see over the week whend this announcement happened on yesterday? runs on the atms at the banks in cypress because they'd shut down the banks as a result of this. they stopped all wire transfers and you also if you tried to take money out they had partitioned out the amount of money that you were supposed to be giveing to the government each though there hasn't been a vote in parliament. why did cypress need a bailout? its banks are bust. the reason the banks in sicypru they bet the greek debt would not be restructured but it was. that's left a lot of them insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of
kind of tax or sees sure of deposits. if approved it could give everyone in the country a bit of relief. basically insuring what is being proposed in cyprus really can not happen here. joining me with details is the cosponsor of the resolution, republican congressman tom coal from oklahoma. congressman, thanks for coming on the show. >> thank you. melissa: do we really need a resolution to protect us from this? is there a danger this would happen, do you think? >> people in cyprus probably thought the same thing a couple days before it happened. do we really need to worry about this? i think we ought to make sure. and look, i don't think it would happen, i will be honest with you. i think, most of our regulators understand how counter productive this is, how it will destroy confidence. it will give people not to put money in safe places like banks. but we ought to reassure people and ought to send an unmistakeable sign to our own bureaucracy, that congress wouldn't tolerate something like that. melissa: has there been talk doing something like this or could you see it happening? i have
of dollars of emergency crash and creditors impose onetime tax of 3% on all bank deposits under $130,000. >> going deep here. >> the tax could be closer to 10% on people who have over $640,000 in the bank. that's according to the "the wall street journal" this morning. people stood in long lines over the weekend to withdraw money before the policy went into effect and now russian president vladimir putin is calling the move, quote, unfair, unprofessional and dangerous. russian citizens make up the majority of billions of euros held in cypress bank. this is important. >> cypress. >> who cares about cyprus? >> come on, cyprus. are you telling me if somebody sneezes in cyprus we get a cold than on the nasdaq? >> tell us why. >> we have a cold on the nasdaq. the nasdaq is going down today. not too many people care about cyprus but a way the europeans have screwed up the bailout by getting the people to pay a part of the cost. you could have a run on the bank and europeans say why do i have my money in this bank? might be a tax on me next. it shows that europe is still a mess, that they h
their carry-ons with them? if you are tired of washington's high taxes and big spending here is one way to stick it to the man >> tom: okay, you go first. i'll be right behind you. i have seen a lot of tax protestors and they do put them in prin when they don't pay their taxes. yes, people go to jail. i'll let you fight the battle first. thanks to everybody that contacted the show. keep your comments coming in. tom sullivan show, we're open for business 24/7. check out our facebook page, and then tom sullivan show. there is a lot of tom sullivan show, you can follome on twitter at sullivan radio and all the things to contact us on the web my main webpage which is tomsullivan.com. thanks for joining us. make sure to tune in to the radio show. listen in through our fox news radio app. download it from itunes. you can hear us online by clicking live button on my main website. we or radio every day from 3:00 to 6:00 p.m. eastern time. we'll have another great show lou: good evening, everybody. thank you for joining us. the dow jones industrials three consecutive record closes in did today a
to the streets to protest and a tax of up to 10% on their life savings. on sunday, fresh protests erupted. on cyprus withre the economist richard wolff after the headlines. and your report says the cia has been supporting a vast expansion in the flow of weapons to syrian rebels fighting president bashar al-assad. the new york times reports the airlift of arms and equipment to the rebels, largely overseen by turkey, has massively increased since early 2012 to include more than 160 flights in jordanian, saudi and qatari planes. u.s. intelligence officers have helped shop for weapons and have vetted rebel groups to decide who gets the arms. the cia's covert backing comes despite the obama administration's public support for solely non-lethal aid to the rebels. meanwhile, the cia has further increased its role in syria by feeding intelligence to rebel fighters for use against the syrian government. the wall street journal reports the move comes as part of the u.s. effort to tamp down on islamist militants in syria by aiding secular forces. secretary of state john kerry has urged iraq to take
because of that deposit tax component. now, the president is currently meeting with the leaders of the political parties. of course, what he's trying to do is to strong arm and to persuade them into voting for that deal because the other alternative, yes, that is bankruptcy for this country, which has only 1 million people and only makes up 0.2% of the entire eurozone. the debate and the vote on that bailout deal will be kicking off in around four hours from now at 4:00 p.m. local time. thou, a lot of uncertainty as to what the outcome of the vote will be, given that nobody has a clear majority. having said that, there is, of course, the chance that some of the lawmakers who have been wavering could have been appeased by the talk that some of the taxes for the smallest depositors could be lowered. now, "the wall street journal" has reported that those deposits between zero is and 100,000 euros could be taxed at only 3% as opposed to 6.75% previously. now, the middle bracket would be 100,000 to 500,000 euros. that could be taxed at 10% and then anything in excess of half a millio
-called vice taxes. you have probably heard the sequester cuts go after about $44 billion in this fiscal year. let me give you a sense of this. taxes on tobacco and alcohol and gaming, gambling, lotteries, generated together $75 billion compared tough sequester, that taxes are doing a very powerful job. that is, federal, state and and local revenue. two states, two states have legalized the recreational use of marijuana. they are colorado and washington . colorado collects more than $5 million in sales, $5 million in sales from dispensaries, pot dispensaries, marijuana. washington is reportedly collecting some $750,000 in taxes, although they have been having trouble getting dispensaries registered with the state. it is affecting their revenue. pot smokers procrastinating. hard to imagine. well, regarding that $13 billion pornography industry, 13 billion. california is earning about $36 million per year just in revenue from the porn industry. it's worth about a billion dollars overall to the economy, just in southern california. we we are on the subject of sex in addition to the so-called vic
premiums and insurance costs are rising sky-high. so are taxes. and small business costs are reducing profits by as much as 65% according to one small business owner we will talk to tonight. and the virtues of a free market capitalism that we talk about every night on this show are now forbidden fruit at stanford university. a popular long running pro capitalist course at that school has now been cancelled. what is up with that? "the kudlow report" begins right now. >>> first up, a major vote in the cyprus parliament helping to get that country closer to a teal with the european union. michelle caruso-cabrera joins us from cyprus again this evening with the very latest. good evening, michelle. >> reporter: larry, lawmakers here in cyprus taking a huge step tonight to prevent the financial collapse of their country. they pass ad law that will allow for the restructuring of their banks. this essentially means their sickest and largest banks will be down sized and made more healthy. this was a key demand by the european partners in order to secure a 10 billion euro bailout for the countr
, the senate votes to repeal an obamacare tax. there's a headline for you. good morning, everyone. it's the medical device tax and the vote to strike it down 79-20, overwhelming abipartisan, the it helps to fund obamacare, upwards of 40 million people will face huge health insurance cost increases next year. could it be that obamacare is unravelling? don't forget cyprus, civil society is unravelling there. they're running short of gas and basic supplies and they've got 72 hours to come up with big money or else. don't worry, stocks will be up again just a few minutes from now. "varney & company" about to begin. ♪ [ cows moo ] [ sizzling ] more rain... [ thunder rumbles ] ♪ [ male announcer ] when the world moves... futures move first. learn futures from experienced pros with dedicated chats and daily live webinars. and trade with papermoney to test-drive the market. ♪ all on thinkorswim. from td ameritrade. all on thinkorswim. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. rify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. sta
and, of course, old ideas are being revived, the idea of a depositit tax is coming back to the table. but we know, of course, just how unpopular that was. kelly. >> exactly. we seem to be almost back to where we started. carolin, thank you so much for that. carolin and steven both following these developments for us. >>> let's check on market reaction in asia. there's plenty going on in the world aside from cyprus. li sixuan joins us with the latest. eye, sixuan. >> thank you, kelly. markets in asia ending on a mixed note. there are lingering concerns over cyprus and north korean threats. political uncertainty in australia add add pressure on the markets. the asx 200 closed down 0.2% amid julia gillard's leadership. the main data point today was hsbc china flash pmi data for march, showing a rebound in the country's manufacturing activity. with concern, financial sector risks, housing bubbles and inflation, beijing may need to compromise growth to control medium term risks. the shanghai composite eked out a modest gain of 0.3%. in hong kong, the hang seng ended marginally lower ahead
, no one read it before it was passed, and there's quite literally a trillion dollars worth of taxes in the affordable care act. it's underappreciated, there's a tax increase on the economy to turn into big job growth impacts and turn into big cost of insurance impacts, and that's what the fee is for, it's there to get the startup of the new exchanges going and to ensure the high cost paicialghts are covered into the insurance products. gerri: what's interesting because there's a lot of people asking for exclusions already, and am i surprised that thedownon representing auto workers doesn't want to pay this. boeing, as i mentioned before, they are asking for exclusions. suspect this is case where virtually anybody with more than say a thousand employees is going to be knocking on the white house doors asking for personal consideration? >> we, of course, you would. this is a cost of doing business, going to be substantial, and unanticipated cost. we saw this with all the regulations that have been put in place to make obamacare go. one by one, they show up and ask for exclusions becau
are losing due to this tax. >> hank smith, it is pretty extraordinary depositors have to pay for a bailout they didn't necessarily authorize. what do you think about what peter said? is this a recipe that would be used elsewhere in the world? >> i highly down it, maria. look, i think we should take great confidence in our banking system now compared to where we were four or five years ago. our banks are very healthy. t.a.r.p. was a good thing. it protected the financial system and the confidence in the financial system. and our banks are in great shape -- >> they're in the worst shape they've ever been. >> oh, no. >> they're a few interest rate hikes away from insolvency. that's why the fed is keeping rates at zero. >> wait a second. peter, you're saying the banks are a couple interest point ace way from insolvency? >> why to you think when the fed did the stress tests they didn't ask the banks to stress test a collapse in the bond market? they only looked at the stock market or maybe real estate. when interest rates rise substantially, the major banks are going to fail. their balance shee
a silicon valley insider and former yahoo coo daniel rosenzweig on the push for the sales tax. what impact will that have on retailers? you'll want to hear his answer this morning and first, why dollar general can make some sense for your portfolio and take one more look at futures this morning. looking at a pretty decent open for a short workweek this day as we have good friday off here. live from squawk on the street from post 9 when we return. your big picture. but e with the fidelity guided portfolio summary, you choose which accounts to track and use fidelity's analytics to spot trends, gain insights, and figure out what you want to do next. all in one place. i'm meredith stoddard and i helped create the fidelity guided portfolio summary. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >>> shares of dollar general rising in pre-market tradex clueding items that yrms 97 cents a share, beating wall street forecasts and revenues essentially in line with the company benefiting from increased food sales and jimmy,
, was reportedly looking at real estate opportunities on the island. a new law would eliminate taxes on gains from the $9.5 billion he has invested in his own hedge funds. his fund released a statement last friday that indicates he has no plans to permanently relocate. survey says... mark zuckerberg is a top ceo. zuckerberg topped glassdoor.com's list of top ceos of 2013. ceos from sap, mckinsey & company, ernst & young and northwestern mutual rounded out the top five. meanwhile, tim cook slipped from the top spot last year to 18th. employees of the companies vote on their ceo, which means facebook employees really "like" their boss. ceo salaries are under scrutiny as recent filings reveal the earnings of the top brass. according to reports, john stumpf of wells fargo is the highest paid head of a major bank. on the heels of rising profits, his compensation package last year was nearly $23 million. in the automotive sector, ford ceo alan mulally took a pay cut but still made more than his peers at gm and chrysler with $21 million. and in a 25-year-long tradition, warren buffett still makes $100,00
controversial question about a deposit, a compulse or pi eposit tax and what -- compulsory deposit tax. they are proposing 20% of accounts over $130,000 in the bank of cyprus and 4% on the other banks in the sector, bank, the ean lyki second biggest. in theory, these two deposit haircuts won't require another vote, so this makes up another total package, including the plan to save the banks, wind them up and save the cost of recapitalizing, that the cypriots can take on sunday to the euro group and finance mirnses and the i.m.f., based on closed-door meetings that have been going on all day with the troika and say here's our compromise, give us the bail out so we can get opened. it looks like cyprus now is tantalizingly close to a deal. but it it won't come without significant pain for many. peter sharp has this report. >> the people of cyprus had endured a week of increasing uncertainty. as the talks dragged on they took to the streets for yet another night to voice their fears and frustrations. >> if they don't realize that we have strength and we will fight, if they lead us to a dea
trade that stuff and make money off of it if you buy enough quantity. it is triple tax-free. anything related to california, municipalities, people are buying them. they are buying them at discount and they are trading them. they are clipping the coupons. do they hold them until maturity? maybe not. here is one more, yankee stadium that that was issued to basically build the garage, again, buying with pennies on the dollar. you do not necessarily hold it until maturity. this is a trade. trade detail risk. big risk here. you can make some money. >> i will follow your advice and not go into this market. california, basketcase when it comes to taxes. it seems too low if they are trading at pennies on the dollar. charlie: it is the real distress stuff like this west virginia tobacco bonds. why aren't the tobacco bonds distressed? when you raise taxes, people will not smoke. they will not pay the taxes. as a trade, you can make some money. jon corzine rolled the dice with short term, i it was italian bonds and spanish bonds. his dad turned out money good. people lost confidence in his abil
. there was such a huge backlash over a proposed tax on bank deposits. >> yeah. >> very outspoken about that. >> absolutely. including people around europe worried too. you see there some worried people lining up outside atms because the banks are still closed, our nick paton walsh is in the capital. >> the reason people are in such large numbers is because this atm is working. some getting 500 euros, some less, not sure what the rules are to many of them but it's a symptom of a panic slowly setting in. we have a banking system here that's really beginning to collapse. people in shops saying they'd rather take cash because the people supplying them goods for sale insist on receiving cash concern for the government's pay system won't function in the 48 hours ahead. but above all people just trying to make sure they have enough money to get through the days ahead. >> so much uncertainty. so much distrust. richard quest is joining us now from london on this. so what happens monday if they don't come up with a so-called plan b? >> right. if there is no credible, workable plan, or a bailout plan,
of this rescue are much different than the other ones. their bank deposits will be taxed. if you have over 100,000 euros in the bank 9.9 percent levy. less than, 6 and three quarters percent. many nervous people tapped out the atm. a lot of russians have money in cyprus. it is up for a parliamentary vote this afternoon. it can be changed and amended to penalize the smaller for less. the good news is markets in cyprus are closed today for holiday. futures are reacting very negative. >> that's scary the government. nabbing your money like that. people at the office notice younger people can be i am mature. >> appearance punkality and honesty all matter in the workplace. a survey of 400 human resources say a third of the highers aren't professional. 40 percent say they lack work ethic. 52 percent new hires have this heir of entitlement. might be they are more confident. they might have been coddleed by their parents. in this tight job market there's a lot of ways you can turn your passion into your job. many of the candidates might be saying i am too good for this job. >> they need the job to mak
for 1 trillion in tax increases over the next decade. elizabeth plan will break it down at the bottom of the hour. president obama wrapping up four day tour in the middle east. before leaving israel the president managed to broker a an apology from netanyahu to the british prime minister over commando raid turkish ship that killed 8. he admitted mistakes were made in 2010 as forces were nato embargo. >> can i tell you about this meteor? >> i love that i was up up all night tracking this. this was the meteor they were talking about if you live along the east coast. it's all anybody is talking about. video of reportedly a meteor over a home in maryland from north carolina all the way up to maine. hundreds of people reported official across the sky. claims to captured the security video too. nasa experts says the space rock was probably the size of a softball or volleyball. they are not sure what size ball it was. perhaps a basketball. it burned up in the atmosphere though. >> alisyn: thank goodness. thank you for monitoring that. please call me immediately if you see it heading towards
. his government has been blamed for a lot. the country has become a bit of a tax haven for rich russians. some banks, we are told now, will reopen on tuesday, but restrictions will be in place. there was real fear there will be a run on those banks when they do reopen and in fact, we have just learned that the two biggest and most troubled banks will not reopen tomorrow. we're told now they won't open again until thursday. what is the u.s. take away from all this, megyn? >> europe, the ally, and trading partner for the united states, certainly, is intact. that's a good thing. but according to experts, the credibility of the euro shall the credibility of the european union has been damaged by all of this back and forth for the past couple of days. as you noted, a very dangerous precedent has been set, that is dipping into private bank accounts to pay for the government, and maybe that's why we see the markets both here and in the states go down today. >> megyn: greg palkot, thank you. it's not often that the economy in cyprus makes global headlines, but experts say the latest and
and the latest deposit tax scheme. happy anniversary, apple dividend and it was a year ago when the tech giant announced its dividend in 17 years. will apple succumb to the bigger payout as it faces stiffer competition from samsung. lululemon doing the downward facing dog with the transparency with the iconic black yoga pants prompting the retailer to cut sales guidance and boeing clinches an order from ryanair. of course, we begin with the markets. the dow and the s&p 500 hoping to avoid their first three-day losing streak of the year. wall street will be paying close attention in about three hours from now. that country's parliament scheduled to vote on a proposed tax on bank deposits and the controversial measure appears set to go down in defeat. here in the u.s., policymakers begin a two-day meeting in which they're expected to hold current policy. this is one of the meetings where we will get a press conference and people will be hanging on every word and every use of every adjective coming out of the fed chairman's mouth. are you expecting anything? >> i think that, frankly, we are looki
been taxing literally all of the accounts, so they kept the banks closed so people wouldn't drain their accounts. so what is happening now. >> cyprus has struck a deal that taxes just the biggest bank accounts, anything more than $130,000. and that will hit mainly foreign investors. will hit them the hardest anyway because the banking system in cyprus takes in billions of dollars in foreign investment, especially from russia. >> but the deal is good for americans, europe is actually one of our biggest trading partners. and if it's in turmoil, europeans not in the mood to buy any american goods. american markets were higher friday in the hopes the deal would be reached this weekend. what is the reaction today? >> zain asher's in new york for us. tell us what happened. there was a bit of a bounce but then it came back. what's been the impact? hey, michael, and suzanne. sduric manages a gain. dow hit a new intraday high 14,563. the s&p got within one point of a record high. but we watched the s&p a little bit more closely because it's bigger, 500 stocks as opposed to the dow's 30. an
fashion bank run. cbs news reporter on the tax plan that emptied out the atm's. >> there is growing anger. hundreds gathered in the streets to protest their bank accounts. they were trying to pull their money out. and that the banks will shut down at least until thursday as they are waiting for the banks to reopen. >> it is our time to draw all that money. we can't trust them anymore. yeah, it's sick. >> reporter: the secret administrators met on monday to discuss a plan. the government wants to take money from their citizens to help with the troubled financial system in the country. lawmakers are expected tvote on the package on tuesday. the proposal to take money directly from peoples accounts have never been done before. markets around the world fell up here in london, but opened up with a triple drop. >> it sort of goes with the primal fear of people that will protect their nest egg for the future. and that it will disappear. >> reporter: it is leading to their demonstrations across the country as they popped the bulldozer outside the bank in protest. and the level of anger is only ex
. but the size of the payout is now very clear. what is also clear is how much that winner will pay in taxes with the higher rates for the rich. here's abc's rob nelson tonight. >> 31. >> reporter: one numbers game now leads to another. the lucky soul who bought the winning ticket in new jersey beat the extraordinary odds of 175 million to 1. the winner can either take a lump sum payment of $211 million. or take the full $338 million over the next three decades. most winners, of course, go for the instant gratification. and this year it comes with a heftier tax bill. in fact. >> $11 million more to uncle sam, this year compared to last year. all thanks to this year's tax hike. the winner's name and hometown could be released as early as tomorrow. >> and i was thinking, is that the right numbers? is that the right numbers? and i was shaking. >> reporter: mark and cindy hill are now using their $136 million in winnings from last year to build a new ball field and firestation in their missouri hometown. others dream of things slightly more self-indulgent. >> a beach house. >> a mansion down in
price. tracy: have you felt the impact of the rising payroll tax? some people say, no, i am not one of them. we have a surprising result of a new survey ahead. former nfl grbac and winery owner group bledsoe is here and is lobbying efforts to allow direct wine sales. ashley: let's take a look at battles as we had to the break. the dollar increasing in value. gold moving lower as a result. we will be right back. ♪ it's monday. a brand new start. your chance to rise and shine. with centurylink as your trusted technology partner, you can do just that. with our visionary cloud infrastructure, global broadband network and custom communications solutions, your business is more reliable - secure - agile. and with responsive, dedicated support, we help you shine every daof the week. gives you 1% cash back on all purchases, plus a 50% annual bonus. and everyone but her... no. no! no. ...likes 50% more cash. but i don't give up easy... do you want 50% more cash? yes! yes?! ♪ [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card gives you 1% cash back on every purchase, plus a 50% annual bo
the $600,000 in estate taxes she had to pay when her partner died. that's what we are talking about. that's the kind of equality. regardless of what the court decides, edith and dhea are still going to love each other and still going to be a couple. >> the thing is thatied itds and thea don't want to separate but equal treatment under the law when it comes to civil universityions or marriage. that's what this whole thing about. >> it is not separate and equal. that's the whole conversation. it is not. more than 1,000 laws that are separating, you know, same-sex couples and heterosexual couples that are in the same comparable relationship. more than 1,000 laws. essentially i pay more taxes for no other reason than sexual orientation. no other reason than how i was born. not separate but equal. separate and unequal. >> i want to play this because i know that you want to address this. we had an e-mail exchange. i did get it in the show just for you. ralph reid making controversial remarks on today's "meet the press." >> what i said was the verdict of social science is overwhelming and irrefu
tax on the large depositors which would lead to a tax of around 15% or 16%. or they can basically restructure their two bad banks. it would be very simple to do that. what would happen is the banks would write off all their equity, write-off their senior debt, write-off their dpovt subordinated debt. and then the large depositors would president owners of the new bank and convert. >> narrator: between 50% and 30% of their new depositors in the banks. >> could they say we don't want to do anything of those? >> certainly they can choose to do that. i don't think that's necessary. basically, if they do nothing, and the ecb carries through with its policy of cutting off liquidity on monday, they will have no choice but to restructure the two banks. >> are you surprised to see lines forming? >> no. depositors are frightened for their money. they've been told there's a high likelihood of the banks closing and staying closed for a period of time. in fact, the lines are not as long as i would have expected them. >> wow. interesting 30i7b9. i had a discussion with simon hobbs, my colleague
.7 trillion budget almost completely along party lines. it raises taxes for the wealthiest americans and cuts spending by $875 billion. but it is so different from the drastic cuts recently passed by the house, that few if any expect the budgets to be reconciled and instead congress is expecting another fiscal battle in july when president obama will likely ask for increased borrowing power. president obama has returned to washington tonight after his trip to the middle east. the president took a break from diplomacy for the final leg of the trip touring the ancient city ever petra in jordan of the petra was built more than 2,000 years ago, carved out of stone between massive delivers. mr. obama called the scene royry spectacular." >> activists in san francisco gave training on how to protest against the keystone xl pipeline during president obama's upcoming visit. a few dozen gathered at federal building to take part in the training and if approved bit obama administration that pipeline could carry oil from alberta, to refineries on west coast. >> the struggle over california's mental heal
, which is to tax depositors below 100,000 euros. exactly one week later, that idea is completely dead. it's not going to happen. however, if you have uninsured deposits, over 100,000 euros in either one of the two banks that are going to be restructured, you are going to suffer severe losses, anywhere between 30% and 70% depending on which bank. equity goes to zero. junior bondholders to zee he row. senior bondholders for the most part to zero depends on the bank. what's the impact for investors? if you are an investor in european banks, you are on notice. every single bailout that has happened, your protection has diminished step by step by step. this is by design. it is europe's stated goal that by 2018 bailouts will not be a burden of the taxpayer. they will be born by the private sector and the investors in the questionable institutions. these banks will likely see interest rates rise as a result of this, maybe the countries that they're in. the question is, is this going to cause broader risk or force discipline and responsibility or both? >> additionally, european decision making on
janet be well and she's not perfect. tell her i said that. during my time in public life and been a tax auditor, tax commissioner, said this is an area on how difficult it is and how difficult it is to make up every day and whether you're primary mission is to protect people. we are held accountable for how we do it and we are in a time of tight budget questions. when we have 10 years or we aren't able to pass audit, it gets increasingly difficult to justify to the american public that we are doing the right thing here. i'm new to this and i can tell you i sat through 10 hearings like this on a gao audited a tougher. i want to give you an example of why the american public is frustrated. recently in north dakota you guys remixed three full-body scanners to move to other locations to replace scanners that she had to replace because they did not pass privacy measures. by now, north dakota is a place of great economic growth. in fact, their airport is experiencing a 49% increase in passengers. we have more airlines flying in there. the airport is understaffed, yet you remove the scanner ca
to collect sales tax from all out of state internet retailers will take place in the senate today. inevitably, it has a lot of support from the big box retailers in particular. let's bring in john harwood who is live from d.c. though this may just be a symbolic vote, weir to are told john. >> symbolic, but not meaningl s meaningless. it's a spring training of sorts to test opinion within congress on various causes. we saw a vote yesterday on the budget resolution, on the repeal of a medical device tax that was included to help finance the national health care law in the early part of the obama administration. the reason it's spring training is that budget resolutions themselves are not lost. so these are not binding votes, but they're a way to test sent ims for what they make later on and that's what we're seeing on the online sales tax situation. 48 states already have laws on the books requiring online retailers to collect state sales tax, but those laws are often ignored and you have a bill that has some bipartisan support that would require all states to collect those taxes. if split, th
in russia because of preferential tax treatment. two days of talks ended up without any agreement. bloomberg quotes saris as saying cyprus will continue to gain some kind of assistance from russia. he says there's still possibility to get conditions eased for the loans russia has extended in the past. >>> tensions are rising i >>> representatives from japan and the uk sponsored it. the three members of the commission will look into north korea's network of political prisons. japan's ambassador cited the abduction of korean nationals. >> japan strongly believes that a inquiry to investigate human rights will provide the council with con degree o-- concrete outcomes. >> the north korean ambassador criticized this. >> of the hostile forces, those human rights abuses have totally nothing to do with it. >> he has said that north koreans face widespread and systematic allegations. >>> last year, members of ansar dean. they were associated with al qaeda. it prompted french forces to intervene in the fighting in the former french colony. some security analysts suspect a link between it and a hostage
costs down. what's your plan? ishares. low cost and tax efficient. find out why nine out of ten large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. squa championship game rapped up. winning the acc for the first time this school history, but still wasn't enough to earn them a one seed in the big dance. miami is a two seed in the east region. louisville number one overall. the other one seeds are kansas, indiana and gonzaga. last year's number one overall seed, kentucky, they failed to make the tournament this year. st. louis wrapped up the atlantic 10 title yesterday taking care of bcu. after the game they tried to get right to the airport so they could watch the selection show, but they got stuck in traffic in new jersey, so the entire team stopped off at a local best buy and set up their own watch party. shoppers joined them as they learned they would be the four
for seven. wait a minute, a have a 3% mortgage after the tax deduction feel like more of a bridge. liz: how do we implement this? how do we say to the lobbyists. this will become what 2 has become, five years done? somebody has to compromise. >> everyone wants to do not in my backyard. it has to be part of a grand plan. part of a total revenue package and expense cutting package, right? if we're able to accomplish that, implementation is relatively easy. first thing i rather keep mortgage deduction. we all would. because we see tangible benefit. only if they are going to tippinger with it. don't eliminate it. look for ways to generate revenue, activity through the economic revenue and still give people a benefit especially first-time home buyer. liz: they say a solution that gets everybody upset is the best solution. >> probably. liz: it would annoy the mortgage industry. it would annoy homeowners who want it. would annoy the government because they want it eliminated. maybe it is a good idea. get your prediction on mortgage rates coming up. they have been historically low. >> they have sta
is it that allowed or condoned or suggested the idea that the lower threshold of 100,000 euros should be taxed? >> listen to the statement out of the european commission. one of the myriad of bureaucrats in brussels. the commission made it clear in the euro group meeting before and they capitalized before, the vote in the cypriot government that an alternative solution would be acceptable and preferably one without a levy on deposits below 100,000. the cypriots did not accept such an alternative scenario and they squarely placed the blame on the guys in the parliament building behind me. so we'll see what happens. the breaking point is at some point we're not going to keep stuffing the atms with money. and they'll have to figure it out and close down some banks, et cetera. >> i respect the detail that you've been through, but this market clearly believes that the deal will get done and the banks will get propped up with international aid. we're up 72 points on the dow. nobody in the market appears to be worried about it and we haven't seen a big move on bonds today. how do you reconcile that w
in congress especially in the senate. they did rise above a lot of the special interests with tax reform and fixing the social security system. they managed to survive re-election. if you take principled positions, stand up for them, explain them to your constituents, you know, maybe they'll raise more money by refusing the wall street guys and going to the main street constituents who vote for them. i think at the end of the day they'll sleep better at night t too. >> that's all the more reason to read "bull by the horns." sheila bear, thank you very much for what you're doing and for being with me today. >> thanks for having me. ♪ >>> it's not only our banking system that remains questionable and shaky, it's the whole of our economy, that complex mix master of capital and labor, prices and production, goods and services, rewards and punishments, largely driven by private decisions in what has been defined, mythologically, as "the free market." capitalism t, it turns out, is a capital idea if you have the capital. which brings us back to richard wolf. i say "back" because as many of y
. the senate bill calls for deficit reduction through increasing taxes and spending cuts and, of course, the house bill calls for steep cuts in balancing the budget within ten years. of course, some revisions to medicare as well. a lot of differences and we have another deadline coming up. the debt ceiling will have to be revisited this summer, alex. >> looking forward to that. >> reporter: yeah, we all are. >> thank you very much, kristen welker. >>> joining me right now, andy sullivan and ann palmer. ann, i'll begin with you. the president is back from the middle east. the reviews are out there. how are you getting the word in terms of how he was perceived? >> i think one of the key things you can look at is what the israeli press put out in the days following his first steps and throughout the entire visit and it was a resounding applause. he got very good praise from them. obviously from what he was trying to do was take that frosty relationship with benjamin netanyahu and try to piece it back together. he did that. it was exactly what he needed to do. there wasn't a lot of meat on
trillion in new taxes over the next ten years. with significantly less spending cuts than the house plan. the budget vote fell along party lines. not a single republican voted in favor. and four democrats facing re-election voted against it. this budget isn't binding, just a blueprint. so now the senate will have to work with the house and the president to reach common ground. until a budget is reached, the automatic spending cuts leaving federal government employees furloughed and closing air traffic control towers will keep on going. david? >> while we're talking about the budget, reena, i want to ask you a lot of viewers have been tweeting about, joe biden, the vice president, of course in the other number, he rang up this past week. >> reporter: that's right. $1 million for two nights in london and paris hotel for him and his security and staff. the state department secured the hotel contract and they said it's pretty much on par with what they pay for a high-level international trip. i'm guessing the holiday inn wasn't an option. >> reena, thank you. >>> tomorrow morning, on abc's "
a bailout and a bank tax in cyprus kept investors on edge. here's a look closing numbers. the dow fell 62. . >> the nasdaq dropped 11. . >> of the s&p fell eight. . >> city group has agreed to pay seven of the $30 million to settle a class-action su$730 million to settle a class-action lawsuit that claimed investors were misled by the banks' disclosures when they purchased its debt and preferred stock. the investors purchases were made from may 11, 2006 through november 2008. to group inc. denied the allegations but agreed to the settlements or to get rid of future expenses and uncertainties that came along with the drawn out litigation. >> coca-cola is taking of water and doing what coke is famous for giving it some bubbles and flavor. the company confirmed monday that it would introduce a lot of fruit flavored seltzer water is called for water started a first. for water comes at a time when americans are drinking less soda, after per capita sales hit a high in the late 1990's. the decline has been attributed to growing concerns about obesity, as well as the proliferation of options in t
reports new york is offering tax incentives to lure the show back to the big apple. as far as who would replace fallon after he moves on up in the lineup the new york post said nbc could dip into the "snl" pool once again, the great seth meyers is rumored to be the top man for the job. cnn reached out to nbc but the network is not commenting. >>> it was 50 years ago today when pop culture changed forever. today is the 50th anniversary of the release of the beatles' first album. please please me. the lp hit shelves in britain on march 22nd in 1963. sales started out slow. but it would hit number one in may. the british invaded and the beatles never looked back and neither did society. >>> game of thrones fans you still have a full week plus to wait for the premiere of season three but we can help you get your fix before then. don't miss my interview next week with game of thrones cocreator david benioff and i'll try to pry a few secrets out of him about the upcoming season. we asked you earlier to come up with a new cheer for harvard's basketball team. go crimson! at least we've got most
rescuing cyprus from bankruptcy and collapse of its banking system. the controversial plans tax bank deposits will be scrapped. the deal would shut down the second largest bank. >>> secretary of state john kerry delivering a warning to iraqi leaders during a surprise weekend stop in baghdad. the u.s. wants iraq to stop letting iran use airspace for flights to syria. officials believe the flights are carrying weapons to the syrian government. iran says flights are bringing humanitarian supplies to syria. >>> new developments in the murder of colorado's top corrections officer. abc news learned prisons in the state have been on lockdown because of fears there could be more attacks. and it all appears to be linked to a white supremacist group. >> reporter: the motive for the murder of tom clements may have been revenge for breaking up a prison gang. clements concerned about the rise of a white supremacist group, 211 crew, sent its leaders to another prison trying to diminish their power base. evan ebel just paroled in january was a member of 211 crew. law enforcement yet to confirm the
defense these anmissle systems. i feel like sometimes the american tax payer is told we need these systems. we invest all of this money and more likely than that we probably will never use them. we can take the money we are spending in the systems and invest in programs that people can really use. we are told we need the systems but they do not work. at the end it is a big waste of money. i want to know if i am wrong in thinking that way or if there are other people thinking that way. we put all this money in the systems -- we need to be paying money into schools and scholarships and crime and social programs. we put it in a bomb that we probably will never use. host: an estimated $9 billion? guest: every year. reagan's vision, we are not putting a lot of fight dia behind an impregnable shield. i do apologize for being scary but i often try to underscore -- if the north koreans try to attack us i think they would fail, even without missile defense. their missile systems and nuclear weapons would probably not even get this country intact if they tried to put it on a --g-range it o'clock dic
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